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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)
to gwen. >> ifill: michigan, home to the united auto workers and one of the most heavily unionized states in the country, is suddenly ground zero in the national debate over workers' rights, as the republican lawmakers who control the state's legislature prepare to cast a vote tomorrow that could permanently alter the political landscape. >> ifill: hundreds of people descended on the state capitol building in lansing last week to protest a move to make michigan a right-to-work state. republicans running the state house and senate have approved a pair of bills to allow workers to hold union jobs without joining the union. organized labor was furious. >> you will have people that will be working right ale long side of you that will not have to pay union dues but you pay union dues but will still be able to get all the benefits from being a union member. >> ifill: democrats in the legislature complained that republicans rammed through the bill with no hearings or public comments. >> this is a travesty. they're pushing this at the 11th hour because they know that the public doesn't want it. >
's debate over right-to- work laws which would prevent labor unions from requiring membership. >> woodruff: paul solman explores the tax deductions that could be on the chopping block in the quest to bring down the deficit. >> we estimate $1.1 trillion a year in revenue the government gives up because of all the tax breaks. that's enough to solve the revenue problem but it's not going to happen. >> ifill: ray suarez has a newsmaker interview with secretary of homeland security janet napolitano. >> you can discuss border security and immigration reform simultaneously now. we don't have to this kind of first this and then that. at this point they actually go together. >> woodruff: special correspondent rick karr reports on the polluted waters that spilled into new york homes and businesses in superstorm sandy, raising health concerns. >> everybody sort of got sick at the same time. all of us sort of attributed it to, well, we're all stressed out. it's very cold. but that said, there is a lot of nasty stuff hanging about. >> ifill: and hari sreenivasan has an update on the dangerous working c
the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a state considered a cradle of the union movement, today struck a blow against organized labor. the republican-dominated state legislature approved laws that deny unions the right to require membership in exchange for a job. more than 12,000 people gathered outside the state capitol in lansing to protest the move. inside, they chanted "shame on you!" at republican governor rick snyder. late today he signed the bill. for more, we're joined by micheline maynard, a contributor to forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just
with the organized labor movement, michigan, has approved legislation vastly limiting the power of unions in the state. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we get the latest on the passage of the right to work laws and the angry demonstrations inside and outside the state capital building. >> woodruff: then, we turn to protests in another part of the world, egypt, where supporters and opponents of president morsi staged rival rallies in cairo four days ahead of vote on a proposed constitution. >> suarez: next in our series of conversations about solving the fiscal crisis, gwen ifill talks with representative allyson schwartz, a democrat from pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more peopl
of cooperation between the district and the teachers' union in planning for the common core implementation. >> as contentious as our relationship has been, the one place that we totally agree is on how to figure out instructional delivery. >> reporter: but the good feeling between the union and the district breaks down when it comes to how students will be evaluated. beginning in 2014-15 school year a new assessment test will replace the current state test. the results could be shocking. >> the reality is we're actually going to see a drop-off. we're close to around 70% of students at proficient on the illinois test right now. predictions show that we may drop to somewhere in the teens. in terms of proficiency. that's chicago. but that's going to be a trend we're going to see across the country. the standards are that much more rigorous. >> reporter: the union is concerned that a dramatic drop in test scores could have a disastrous impact for teachers who will be evaluated on student performance. >> everyone will be judged and possibly very harshly. what we're really concerned about is tha
21 points to close at 2,992. the european union came a step closer to a full-fledged banking union today. after an all-night meeting in brussels, e.u. finance ministers agreed to give the european central bank oversight of eurozone banks, as well as banks in other e.u. countries that choose to opt-in. the european commissioner for economic and monetary affairs said the agreement was an important step forward for europe. >> last night's decision on the single supervisory mechanism for euro area banks is a breakthrough towards a true banking union, which is significant and crucial in order to restore and reinforce confidence in the european economy. >> sreenivasan: the banking superviser role must be approved by the european parliament, but the position could be up and running by march of next year. separately, finance ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s
, staking a moral dimension to the union cause. and the document became a symbol of hope for the nearly 4 million slaves held in confederate states. reg nalted washington is a senior archivist with the national archive. >> it confirmed their belief that the war should always have been a war for-- not to preserve the union but a war to free the slaves. >> reporter: written on paper rather than more durable parchment, the proclamation has faded over the years from light exposure. and now spends most of the time in protective dark storage in the national archives. but it commands large crowds on those rare occasions like today when it's on public display, and even 150 years later, it retains the power to inspire. >> it's a historical document. it's something that i think is important to our country, our nation and specifically african-americans. >> this is the document really that started to free the black slaves, do i had to come see it. >> had to come down after researching my great grandparents all of whom were slaves. so i had to come and see that document. >> and it's such a mix. it's s
of los angeles and long beach, california reopened today after port operators and the worker's union reached an agreement late tuesday. the union said it won new protections against job outsourcing. port officials said during the walkout, they were unable to move some $760 million worth of cargo a day. wall street had a day of ups and downs and investors watched economic reports and weighed chances for a fiscal cliff deal in washington. the dow jones industrial average gained more than 82 points to close at 13,034. but the nasdaq fell nearly 23 points to close at 2,973. the day's big loser was apple, down more than 6% over concerns that smart phone sales are lagging. former texas congressman jack brooks has died. he served 42 years in the house, and was in the dallas motorcade on november 22nd, 1963 when president kennedy was assassinated. hours later, brooks was on hand as vice president and fellow texan lyndon johnson was sworn in to the presidency. later, brooks helped author the 1964 civil rights act, and he drafted the articles of impeachment against president nixon. jack brooks
. the workers' union contract expires this weekend, and a white house spokesman said today the two sides need to agree on a contract extension as soon as possible. talks broke down last week in a dispute over wages and royalties. the christmas season storm that blasted the south and midwest swept across the upper northeast and new england today and the death count climbed to 16. the system dumped a foot or more of snow in parts of pennsylvania, upstate new york and new hampshire. in some places, snow brought road travel to a standstill. at the same time, operations at major airports improved, with far fewer delays than earlier this week. in india, the embattled prime minister remained under pressure to take action against sexual assaults after a gang rape this month triggered violent protests. manmohan singh promised a thorough review of india's rape laws and efforts to expedite trials. meanwhile, police moved to quell a rally by about 500 students protesting the treatment of women as they moved toward a monument in new delhi. the students complained officials had declared the site off limits
their constitutions to bar gay unions. here with us to explain today's development, and where it could lead, is marcia coyle of "the national law journal." welcome back, marcia. >> thanks, marg wet. >> warner: so is it fair to say first of all that the court's decision to hear these first two cases in itself a momentous decision? >> absolutely. a number of gay rights organizations, particularly as if relates to the federal defense of marriage act have been working towards that point. and yes, whatever the court says, if it reaches the merits of these cases will be extremely important. >> warner: let's take them one by one, prop 8 in california first. remind us briefly of how what started out as a state issue ended am in the supreme court. >> the california supreme court a number of year its ago ruled that same sex marriages were constitutional under its state constitution. voters disagreed by passing proposition 8 in 2008 banning those marriages. proposition 8 was challenged by gay and lesbian couples who were represented by former opponents ted olson and david buoyes. it ultimately reached the federa
, a senior scientist and co-director of global security at the union of concerned scientists. and han park, professor of international affairs at the university of georgia. he travels frequently to north korea and witnessed april's failed rocket launch there. welcome, gentlemen. david wright, beginning with you, how big an advance in this in north korea's drive to develop its long-range missile capability and then to ten potentially something that could be married with their nuclear program? >> . >> we've known for a long time, a number of years north koreans had the individual components that it could use, rocket engines, things like that. it's put them together in a rocket that looks like it has the capability to do what they did yesterday. what they haven't been able to do is to get it to all work together and all work at the same time. so from my point of view, i don't feel that much differently about their program today than i did two days ago simply because the fact that they were able to get everything to work yesterday doesn't mean they could do it again. it doesn't tell me anythin
to come up with solution or approaches within a month, before the state of the union speech. do you worry that the outrage is going to fade before that happens? >> i don't worry about the outrage fading. i worry about our collective courage to break through. and again, for me and for so many people in this country, this is not a new issue. we've been fighting this issue for a long, long time. i, in chicago we buried a child killed by gun violence every two weeks. think about that, every two weeks we bury a child. the vast majority innocent children. one at their birthday parties, in the afternoon. these aren't-- the vast ma jorbted aren't gangbangers. >> ifill: but outside of that neighborhood, it goes unremarked upon, mostly. >> that is what i worry about, is the lack of courage, the lack of willingness to break through. we have an endemic here, and we need to change that in a very fundamental way. and as i said for the horror and the anguish and the pain, i do think the world has shifted. i think people have a sense that enough is enough. and when you have, you know, 20 babies and six t
consumerism, you know? as an immigrant from the former soviet union, anastasia gonye has lived the alternative. >> i stood in line for bread, so there was not enough of things that are necessary to survive, you know, i had to make things for myself-- that's how i started, how i learned that skill, because i had to make clothes myself, if i wanted to look halfway decent. so, it's different. >> reporter: but this is better? >> of course it's better. way better. >> reporter: now, the soviet planned economy grew out of the communist revolution of 1917. but in the us back then, the market reigned, channeling wealth to its most productive uses. the new infomercial thinks that that should still the model. >> increasing productivity needs more savings and investment, the true engine of economic growth. now, hear friedrich hayek sing a song of savings. >> ♪ your savings are borrowed by businessmen, productions ♪ structure is changed. they invest in workers and ♪ capital goods. our economy re-arranged. ♪ >> reporter: but in a recent book, against thrift, livingston shows that private investment,
represented the state of hawaii in congress from the moment it was admitted to the union in 1959. >> our friend dan inouye just died. >> brown: his passing was announced last night to a stunned senate chamber by majority leader harry reid. >> the service in the senate will be... >> an iconic political figure of his beloved hawaii and the only original member of a congressional delegation still serving in congress. >> brown: this afternoon inowe way's deputy chief of staff recalled the senator. >> with all due respect to the president of the united states, inowe way is hawaii's greatest statesman. he always saw things three steps ahead. >> brown: he was born in honolulu in 1924 to immigrant parents. on december 7, 1941, he rushed to help the wounded at pearl harbor. long years later he recalled the u.s. government's war-time decision to declare his family and other japannese americans enemy aliens. >> i put on the uniform to show where my heart stood. but we were denied. so we petitioned the government and a year later they said, okay, if you wish to volunteer go ahead. >> announcer: 442n
is the most diverse state in the union. we best represent the upon population of the united states of america. we're very dwirs, but i think we need to show the nation that a group of people committed to the common good can come together and pass a law that's necessary for the public safety, whether you're in a rural area, a suburban or urban area, we all have children. those of white house are parents understand how precious life is. we have a great poeet from illinois, carl sandberg who said, "the birth of a baby is god's opinion the world should go on." it's high time we protect our children, protect our babies from the harm of assault weapons and high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> ifill: do you have any sense that public opinion is shifting in your state? >> oh, i believe so. i don't think there's any question. anecdotally, just visiting with the people on the street-- i was at a daycare center today, an early-childhood center, and you can tell how committed moms and dads are to getting a law pads to protect their children. no matter where you live in america, children come first. the
, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america" from washington. america" from washington. the authority
, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> christmas begins at the church of the nativity, as thousands celebrate at the midnight mass in bethlehem. pope benedict conducts christmas eve mass. two firefighters are killed, two wounded as it is another gun attack. hello. welcome to bbc news. also in this program, the
, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is a special addition -- addition reporting live from newtown, conn.. heartbreaking farewell. of the first of the funerals of the 26 people killed in america's deadliest school shootings. in response, the u.s. lawmakers about action. will b
, newman's own foundation and union bank. >> at union bank our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> egypt's new constitution is approved by more than 60% of voters who took part in the referendum. queen elizabeth hags used her christmas message to praise the volunteers for her diamond jubilee. >> people of all ages took trouble to take part in various ways and in many nations. perhaps the most striking of all was to witness the fellowship and friend ship of those who would gather together on these occasions.
. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions and capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news america." >> president morsi calls on those to join in a national dialogue. another high-profile deserter these for the opposition as heavy fighting continues. at least 20 people are dead. tornadoes and snowstorms bring travel chaos and power cuts to the eastern united states. welcome to "bbc world news." also in this program --
lincoln quote. in fact, barack obama quoted from the same passage in his state of the union address. >> i'm a democrat. but i believe what republin abraham lincoln believed-- that government should do for people only what they cannot do better by themselves and no more. ( applause ) >> you can take away from lincoln almost anything that you want. presidents in war time, embattled presidents, unpopular presidents-- they all look to lincoln. he's their patron saint, because no president was more embattled or more unpopular than lincoln was during his presidency. we think he was born on mount rushmore. noto. theodore roosevelt hung his picture in the president's office and said, "whenever i have a major decision to make, i always ask myself would lincoln would do." woodrow wilson, who was a son of the south, who remembered seeing jefferson davis in chains being led past him at the end of the war nevertheless developed something of a hero worship for lincoln. richard nixon, as a 12-year-old, was given a portrait of lincoln that he hung over his bed. nixon also justified what would lar be seen
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 70 (some duplicates have been removed)